Bereavement Counselling

Coming to terms with death can involve many feelings, for example, denial and isolation, anger, deep sadness, loss, emptiness, and depression. These are normal. Each person experiences bereavement in his or her own way and every bereavement will have its own unique process.

A bereaved person might alternate between denial, anger, sadness, fear, and guilt many times a day. The way bereavement is experienced depends upon individual personality and the way a person typically responds to crises and loss, the circumstances of the death, the relationship the bereaved person had to the person who has died, and our attitudes and beliefs towards death and life in general. It may also be affected by how much we are supported by others and by how much other stress we have in our lives at the time.

Bereavement may also bring physical effects such as weight loss, lack of concentration, and sleep disturbance. The bereaved person may experience a loss of memory, loss of self-esteem and identity, and on occasion may even begin to take on the characteristics of the person who has died. They may begin to neglect their appearance for a time and feel that nothing matters any more. Although these are all normal reactions, at such times it can help to talk  about what is being felt.

Bereavement counselling may be able to offer you support until life begins to make sense again.